Moby Dick eBook: Herman Melville: Amazon.fr: Boutique Kindle

Moby Dick eBook: Herman Melville: Amazon.fr: Boutique Kindle

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Avec Moby Dick, Melville a donné naissance à un livre-culte et inscrit dans la mémoire des hommes un nouveau mythe : celui de la baleine blanche. Fort de son expérience de marin, qui a nourri ses romans précédents et lui a assuré le succès, l'écrivain américain, alors en pleine maturité, raconte la folle quête du capitaine Achab et sa dernière rencontre avec le grand cachalot. Véritable encyclopédie de la mer, nouvelle Bible aux accents prophétiques, parabole chargée de thèmes universels, Moby Dick n'en reste pas moins construit avec une savante maîtrise, maintenant un suspense lent, qui s'accélère peu à peu jusqu'à l'apocalypse finale. L'écriture de Melville, infiniment libre et audacieuse, tour à tour balancée, puis hachée au rythme des houles, des vents et des passions humaines, est d'une richesse exceptionnelle. Il faut remonter à Shakespeare pour trouver l'exemple d'une langue aussi inventive, d'une poésie aussi grandiose. --Scarbo

Extrait

Call me Ishmael. This resonant opening of Moby-Dick, the greatest novel in American literature, announces the narrator, Herman Melville, as he with a measure of slyness thought of himself. In the Scriptures Ishmael, a wild man sired by the overwhelming patriarch Abraham, was nevertheless the bastard son of a serving girl Hagar. The author himself was the offspring of two distinguished American families, the Melvilles of Boston and the Gansevoorts of Albany.

Melville's father cast something of a blight on the family escutcheon by his tendency to bankruptcy which passed down to his son. Dollars damn me, the son was to say over and over. When he sat down in the green landscape of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to compose Moby-Dick he was in debt, the father of one son, and another to be born a few days after the publication of the novel in England.

Melville had published five novels previous to Moby-Dick; the first two did well, and then with the capriciousness of the public the subsequent novels failed to please. He was a known literary figure with a fading reputation. How he came upon the courage to undertake the challenging creation of the epical battle between a sea creature, a white whale called Moby Dick, and an old captain from Nantucket by the name of Ahab is one of literature's triumphant mysteries. Add to that, as one reads, that he was only thirty-two years old.

Ten years before, in 1841, he had signed up as a common seaman on the whaling vessel Acushnet bound for the South Seas. Young Ishmael was drawn by the lure of the sea and by the wonder of the whale itself, the Leviathan, the monarch of the deep, "one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air." Until the discovery of petroleum oil in 1859 and Thomas Edison's invention of the incandescent lamp in 1879, whaling was a major commercial occupation in New England. Fortunes were made, grand houses were built, often with a "widow's walk" on the roof that testified to the great dangers of the enterprise. For the crew, service on a whaler was a drastic life of unremitting labor; foul, crowded quarters; bad food in scanty servings; contractual terms for years at miserable wages; brutalized companions picked up from all the ports of the world; tyrannical captains practicing a "sultanism" which Melville abhorred. A ship afloat is after all a prison. Melville was on three whalers in his four years at sea and from each, as we read in TypeeandOmoo, the struggle is to escape, as he did when the boats anchored near exotic islands. He wrote about the misery of the whaling life, but not about whaling itself until he came to Moby-Dick. His imaginary whaler, the Pequod, death bound as it is, would be called, for an ordinary seaman, an agreeable berth. Ahab has no interest left beyond his internal struggle with one whale.

Still, there is whaling, the presumption of it. When a whale is sighted small boats are detached from the main vessel and the men engage in a deadly battle to try to match, with flying harpoons, the whale's immense strength and desperation. If the great thing is captured, the deck of the main ship becomes an abattoir of blood and guts. The thick blubber is to be stripped, the huge head to be drained of its oils for soothing ambergris, for candles; the bones of the carcass make their way into corsets and umbrellas and scrimshaw trinkets. Moby-Dick is a history of cetology, an encylopedic telling of the qualities of the fin-back, the right whale, the hyena whale, the sperm whale, the killer whale, classified by size in mock academic form as folio, octavo, and so on.

Information about a vanished world is one thing, but, above all else, this astonishing book is a human tragedy of almost supernatural suspensiveness, written in a rushing flow of imaginative language, poetical intensity, metaphor and adjective of consuming beauty. It begins on the cobbled streets of New Bedford, where Ishmael is to spend a few days before boarding the Pequod in Nantucket. The opening pages have a boyish charm as he is brought to share a bed with a fellow sailor, the harpooner Queequeg, an outrageously tattoed "primitive" who will be his companion throughout the narrative. Great ships under sail gave the old ports a rich heritage of myth, gossip, exaggeration, and rhetorical flights. Ishmael, on a Sunday, visits a whaleman's chapel to hear the incomparable sermon by Father Mapple on Jonah and the whale, a majestic interlude, one of many in this torrential outburst of fictional genius.

As Ishmael and Queequeg proceed to Nantucket, the shadows of the plot begin to fall upon the pages. The recruits are interviewed by two retired sailors who will struggle to express the complicated nature of Captain Ahab. We learn that he has lost a leg, chewed off by a whale, and thus the fated voyage of the Pequod begins. Ahab has lost his leg to a white whale Moby Dick and is consumed with a passion for retribution. He will hunt the singular whale as a private destiny in the manner of ancient kings in a legendary world. However, Ahab is real and in command. The chief mate, Starbuck, understands the folly of the quest, the danger of it, and, as a thoughtful man longing to return to his wife and children, he will speak again and again the language of reason. "Vengeance on a dumb beast that simply smote thee from the blindest instinct! Madness! To be enraged with a dumb thing, Captain Ahab, seems blasphemous."

The necessity of Starbuck's human distance from the implacable imperative of Ahab's quest illustrates the brilliant formation of this harrowing tale. But it is Ahab's story, his destiny, and, if on the one hand, he is a shabby, sea-worn sailor long mesmerized by mercurial oceans, he too has a wife at home and a child of his old age. We learn, as the story proceeds, that on a time ashore after his terrible wounding, he had fallen and by way of his whalebone leg been unmanned. He has suffered an incapacity not to be peacefully borne by one who in forty years had spent only three on land. Ahab knows the wild unsuitability of his nature, his remove from the common life.

www.choisirunlivre.com

Sujet : Ishmaël s'embarque sur Le Péquod, un baleinier qui va sillonner les océans pendant trois ans. Le bateau est dirigé par le mystérieux capitaine Achab qui martèle le sol de sa jambe de bois. Il n'a de cesse de retrouver Moby Dick, la monstrueuse baleine blanche qui l'a amputé quelques années auparavant. Cette obsession, au détriment de l'équipage, tourne à l'affrontement entre le Bien et le Mal.

Commentaire : Cette adaptation du très long roman d'Herman Melville est une réussite. Le texte, qui reste fidèle à celui d'origine, est ramené à des proportions plus modestes, ce qui le rend plus accessible. La division en chapitres donne tout de même aux jeunes lecteurs l'impression de lire un véritable roman. Cet ouvrage est surtout remarquable pour ses illustrations qui sont, à chaque page, de vrais chefs-d'oeuvre. Grâce à la taille grand format et à la très belle qualité du papier, on pourrait croire que l'on tourne les pages d'un livre d'art. Cet album, qui devrait particulièrement plaire aux garçons, est le cadeau idéal pour les sensibiliser à la littérature et à la peinture.

Revue de presse

Sujet : Ishmaël s'embarque sur Le Péquod, un baleinier qui va sillonner les océans pendant trois ans. Le bateau est dirigé par le mystérieux capitaine Achab qui martèle le sol de sa jambe de bois. Il n'a de cesse de retrouver Moby Dick, la monstrueuse baleine blanche qui l'a amputé quelques années auparavant. Cette obsession, au détriment de l'équipage, tourne à l'affrontement entre le Bien et le Mal.

Commentaire : Cette adaptation du très long roman d'Herman Melville est une réussite. Le texte, qui reste fidèle à celui d'origine, est ramené à des proportions plus modestes, ce qui le rend plus accessible. La division en chapitres donne tout de même aux jeunes lecteurs l'impression de lire un véritable roman. Cet ouvrage est surtout remarquable pour ses illustrations qui sont, à chaque page, de vrais chefs-d'oeuvre. Grâce à la taille grand format et à la très belle qualité du papier, on pourrait croire que l'on tourne les pages d'un livre d'art. Cet album, qui devrait particulièrement plaire aux garçons, est le cadeau idéal pour les sensibiliser à la littérature et à la peinture. -- www.choisirunlivre.com

Description du produit

As the Pequod spirals the globe in search of Moby Dick, the mythical white whale of the Southern oceans, Ishmael and crew must deal with the obsessive revenge of Captain Ahab.

Book Description

Moby-Dick is generally regarded as its author's masterpiece and one of the greatest American novels. The basic plot of Moby-Dick is simple. The narrator (who asks to be called "Ishmael") tells of the last voyage of the ship Pequod out of New Bedford, Mass. Captain Ahab is obsessed with the pursuit of the white whale Moby-Dick, which finally kills him. On that level, the work is an intense, superbly authentic narrative. Its theme and central figure, however, are reminiscent of Job in his search for justice and of Oedipus in his search for truth. The novel's richly symbolic language and tragic hero are indicative of Melville's deeper concerns: the equivocal defeats and triumphs of the human spirit and its fusion of creative and murderous urges.

Ingram

In this adaptation of Melville's masterpiece, McCaughrean recounts the tale of the obsessed Captain Ahab, as he pursues the great white whale--a creature as vast and dangerous as the sea itself. 55 illustrations, 25 in color.

Quatrième de couverture

INCLUDES THE TRUE STORY THAT INSPIRED MOBY-DICK

'A masterpiece' Guardian

When Ishmael sets sail on the whaling ship Pequod one cold Christmas Day, he has no idea of the horrors awaiting him out on the vast and merciless ocean. The ship's strange captain, Ahab, is in the grip of an obsession to hunt down the famous white whale, Moby Dick, and will stop at nothing on his quest to annihilate his nemesis.

'A great book...a deep great artist' D. H. Lawrence

Back Cover copy

This edition of Moby-Dick, released in honor of the book's 150th anniversary, is the authoritative text of one of the world's great adventure stories. A crew of whalers sets out in pursuit of a fierce white whale. Their names ring through the canon of American literature: Ishmael, the narrator; Queequeg, a South Seas harpooner; Starbuck, the sober and serious chief mate; and above all Captain Ahab, part Faust and part Job, leading them to the ends of the earth-and the destiny he will share with his foe. In Moby-Dick, Herman Melville set out to write "a mighty book" on "a mighty theme." As the book, his sixth, neared completion he wrote to Nathaniel Hawthorne about the dilemma he found himself caught in: "What I feel most moved to write, that is banned-it will not pay. Yet, altogether, write the 'other' way I cannot. So the product is a final hash, and all my books are botches."

Contemporary British and American reviewers of Moby-Dick recognized qualities of greatness in the novel and genius in the author but they also complained about anomalies in its genre, plot, characters, language, and thought. By the time of the Melville revival of the 1920s, however, such criticisms had faded from view. Moby-Dick is acclaimed as the mighty book its author envisioned. This text of Moby-Dick is an Approved Text of the Center for Scholarly Editions (Modern Language Association of America).

Biographie de l'auteur

Jame's Prunier a 45 ans. Il vit et travaille à Nancy, où il a suivi les cours des beaux-arts après être sorti de l'École de l'image d'Épinal. Très jeune, il est fasciné par certaines scènes : les locomotives à vapeur près du lac de Constance, les hydravions qui partent de Biscarosse pour New York? Chez lui, les émotions sont restituées par le trait, le dessin, la perspective. Ses mises en lumière et son travail du détail sur ses peintures à l'huile le placent dans la catégorie des artistes illustrateurs qui portent le texte et le magnifient. Du très grand art.

About the author

Herman Melville (1819-91) was an American novelist, short story writer, and essayist. His novels include Typee, Omoo, and White-Jacket, all published in authoritative editions by Northwestern University Press.

Détails & caractéristiques

  • Date de publication:27 septembre 2011
  • Langue:Français
  • ASIN:B005Q47VPC

À propos de cet article

Détails sur le produit

  • Date de publication:27 septembre 2011
  • Langue:Français
  • ASIN:B005Q47VPC
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